About


Who? The Philadelphia Area Math Teachers’ Circle (PAMTC) provides opportunities for professional mathematicians and middle-grades math teachers to engage in collaborative and creative mathematical problem-solving. The PAMTC is part of the Math Teachers' Circle Network of the American Institutes of Mathematics (AIM). We are a small group of committed mathematicians, teachers, and mathematics educators, who live and work in the greater Philadelphia area (see below for biographies of our Leadership Team). Middle-grades math teachers and professional mathematicians in the area are welcome to join us! (See our Contact page.)

What? At PAMTC workshops, middle-grades math teachers and professional mathematicians work on solving problems together that allow each of us to stretch our mental muscles.

Where? Fall Academic year meetings will be held at The Philadelphia School (See our Schedule page)

When? Fall 2014: September 23rd, October 28th and November 17th

How? At PAMTC workshops teachers and mathematicians do not "learn about mathematics," nor do they "practice mathematics," but rather, they will "do mathematics." They will solve challenging, innovative problems and attempt a variety of approaches. These types of problems, we find, have a specific set of characteristics (see our Problems page for more details).

Why? A body of growing research shows that when teachers have opportunities to collaborate and do mathematics, they learn from one another, develop greater enthusiasm for mathematics and their professional community, and strengthen their mathematical knowledge for teaching. As with most pursuits, you can deepen your appreciation of mathematics when you have chances to practice doing it within a supportive community. Teachers, today, don't have as much space in their professional lives to engage in doing real mathematics. One of our goals is to change the perception that mathematicians are specialists: we believe that anyone can become a mathematician! Real mathematics is lively and exciting: it involves inquiry, creativity, discovery, debate, and justification. In contrast, the mathematics commonly experienced in schools involves routine and repetitive practice of known procedures.


Leadership Team
  • Kathleen Boyle, M.S.Ed., Middle School Mathematics Teacher, St. Denis School, Haverford, PA
  • Cathryn Anderson, M.S.Ed., 6th Grade Mathematics Teacher, Washington Township School District (Sewell, NJ)
  • Aimee Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, Swarthmore College
  • Amy Meyers, Ph.D., Lecturer and Program Coordinator, Bryn Mawr College
  • Josh Sabloff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics; Department Chair, Haverford College
  • Joshua Taton, Ph.D. Candidate in Mathematics Education, University of Pennsylvania